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Math: Marketable Skills and Abilities

Marketable Skills and Abilities section 1

First semester (Freshman Year)

  1. Capacity to communicate effectively through written means.
  2. Capacity to communicate effectively through verbal means.
  3. Capacity for organizational and management skills.
  4. Capacity to continue new learning.

Second semester (Freshman Year)

  1. Capacity to think critically.
  2. Capacity for problem solving.
  3. Capacity for written communication and graphic skills.
  4. Understanding of intercultural dynamics.
  5. Ability to work cooperatively with others.

First semester (Sophomore Year)

  1. Experience with communication technology.
  2. Ability to use electronic technologies.
  3. Capacity for interpersonal and communication skills.
  4. Capacity to interact with people.
  5. Capacity to develop the decision making skills.
  6. Understanding of economic influences on marketplace.
  7. Basic computer skills.

Second semester (Sophomore Year)

  1. Capacity for continued new learning.
  2. Ability to demonstrate intercultural skills.
  3. Ability to analyze solutions and provide alternative solutions.
  4. Ability to solve complex problems.
  5. Capacity of dedication and integrity.

Marketable Skills and Abilities- Careers

Careers with a mathematics degree: ( median salary for US)

Actuary                                              $93,680

An actuary is a business professional who deals with the financial impact of risk and uncertainty. Actuaries apply mathematical and statistical theories to solve real business problems. Actuaries assemble and analyze data to estimate the probability and likely cost of an event such as death, sickness, injury, disability, or loss of property. They also address financial questions; including those involving the way a company should invest its resources to maximize its return on investments. “Actuaries are in high demand, and they are highly paid for the services they render.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Probability and Mathematical Statistics, Applied Statistics, Actuarial Mathematics, Optional courses in numerical analysis, some training in operations research, substantial training in computer science

Animator                                            $61,730

An animator is an artist who creates multiple images called frames and key frames that form an illusion of movement called animation when rapidly displayed. Animators can work in a variety of fields including film, television, video games, and the internet.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra

Architect                                            $73,090

Architects design buildings and other structures. They make sure buildings are functional, safe, and economical. They draw plans of every part of a building, including the plumbing and electrical systems. They also help choose a building site and decide what materials to use. Most architects today use computers in their work, and many are self-employed.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Probability and Statistics, Linear Programming

Biologist                                             $44,078

Biologists study living organisms and their relationship to the environment. They perform research to gain a better understanding of fundamental life processes or apply that understanding to developing new products or processes. Most specialize in one area of biology, such as zoology (the study of animals) or microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms).

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Statistics

Budget Analyst                                  $69,280

Budget analysts develop, analyze, and execute budgets, which are used to allocate current resources and estimate future financial needs. They examine budget estimates and proposals for completeness; accuracy; and conformance with established procedures, regulations, and organizational objectives. Sometimes they employ cost-benefit analyses to review financial requests, assess program tradeoffs, and explore alternative funding methods.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry, Calculus I, II, and III, Linear Algebra, Theory of Analysis, Statistics

Cartographer                                    $57,440

Cartographers design, prepare and revise maps, charts, plans, three-dimensional models and spatial information databases, often using computer-based techniques, and applying principles from science, mathematics and graphic design. Cartographers may specialize in topographical maps (which show earth surface features and land use); or maps used for operational purposes in fields such as town planning, weather forecasting, tourism, hydrography, geological or mineral exploration and the military.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Discrete Mathematics, Calculus with Analytic Geometry, Elementary Statistics, Spatial Statistics

Chemical Engineer                           $73,442

Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering that deals with the application of physical science and life sciences with mathematics to the process of converting raw materials or chemicals into more useful or valuable forms. In addition to producing useful materials, modern chemical engineering is also concerned with pioneering valuable new materials and techniques.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Statistics

Climatologist                                      $89,269

Climatologists study climate conditions averaged over a period of time. They use climate models for a variety of purposes, from the study of the dynamics of the weather and climate system to projections of future climate. In contrast to meteorology, which focuses on short term weather systems lasting up to a few weeks, climatology studies the frequency and trends of those systems. Climatology considers the past and can help predict future climate change.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I, II, III, Probability and Statistics, Linear Algebra, Ordinary Differential Equations, Partial Differential Equations, Complex Analysis, Numerical Methods

College Professor                              $62,050

Computer Scientist                            $99,128

Computer scientists work as theorists, researchers, or inventors. They use innovation to solve complex problems and create or apply new technology. The areas of computer science research range from complex theory to hardware design to programming-language design. Some researchers work on projects such as developing and advancing uses of virtual reality, extending human-computer interaction, or designing robots.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I, II, III, Linear Algebra, Ordinary Differential Equations, Theory of Analysis, Abstract Algebra, Graph Theory, Numerical Methods, Combinatorics

Cryptanalyst                                      $76,470

Cryptanalysts design, implement, and analyze algorithms for solving problems. They analyze and decipher secret coding systems and decode messages for military, political, or law enforcement agencies or organizations. They help provide privacy for people and corporations, and keep hackers out of important data systems. They are constantly working on new ways to encrypt information.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I, II, III, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Partial Differential Equations, Elementary Number Theory, Introduction to Real Analysis, Analysis I and II, Methods of Complex Analysis, Mathematical Cryptography

Economist                                          $89,450

Economists study how society distributes resources, such as land, labor, raw materials, and machinery, to produce goods and services. They may conduct research, collect and analyze data, monitor economic trends, or develop forecasts. Economists research a wide variety of issues including energy costs, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, business cycles, taxes, and employment levels, among others.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry, Calculus I and II, Mathematical Economics, Game Theory, Statistics for Economists

Electric Engineer                              $87,920

Electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of electrical equipment. Some of this equipment includes electric motors; machinery controls, lighting, and wiring in buildings; automobiles; aircraft; radar and navigation systems; and power generation, control, and transmission devices used by electric utilities.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Statistics

Forensic analyst                                $52,840

Forensic analysts use scientific techniques to solve criminal cases. They may use traditional methods such as fingerprinting, assisted by computers; in addition, blood analysis, forensic dentistry, voice and speech spectrograms, and genetic fingerprinting. Chemicals, such as poisons and drugs, are analyzed by chromatography and ESDA (electrostatic document analysis) is a technique used for revealing indentations on paper, which helps determine if documents have been tampered with.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry, Calculus I and II, Statistics

Geographer                                       $74,760

A geographer is a scientist whose area of study is geography, the study of Earth’s physical environment and human habitat. Geographers study not only the physical details of the environment but also its impact on human and wildlife ecologies, weather and climate patterns, economics, and culture.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Quantitative Reasoning, Statistics

Geologist                                            $40,437

A geologist is a scientist who studies the solid and liquid matter that constitutes the Earth and terrestrial planets. Geologists usually engage studying geology, and approach this using mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology as well as other sciences.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Statistics

Hydrologist                                        $75,530

Hydrologists apply scientific knowledge and mathematical principles to solve water-related problems in society, such as problems of quantity, quality, and availability. They may be concerned with finding water supplies for cities or irrigated farms, or controlling river flooding or soil erosion. Or, they may work in environmental protection: preventing or cleaning up pollution or locating sites for safe disposal of hazardous wastes.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Ordinary Differential Equations, Probability and Statistics

Market Research Analyst                $71,000

Market researchers gather information about what people think. They help companies understand what types of products people want and at what price. They also help companies market their products to the people most likely to buy them. Gathering statistical data on competitors and examining prices, sales, and methods of marketing and distribution, they analyze data on past sales to predict future sales.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry, Calculus, Mathematical Economics, Statistics

Mathematical Physicist                                 $105,430

A mathematical physicist applies mathematics to problems in physics and develops mathematical methods suitable for the formulation of physical theories.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Topology, Combinatorics

Mathematician                                  $99,380

Mathematics is one of the oldest and most fundamental sciences. Mathematicians do research in fields such as logic, set theory, abstract algebra, number theory, geometry, topology, dynamical systems, combinatorics, game theory, probability, and statistics. Although math has numerous applications, mathematicians also find math interesting in its own right.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I, II, and III, Linear Algebra, Ordinary Differential Equations, Real Analysis, Abstract Algebra, Theory of Analysis, Complex Analysis. This is a very basic list; most mathematicians will study all the math they can and will study additional topics depending on their interests.

Mechanical Engineer                                    $61,469

Mechanical engineers research, design, develop, manufacture, and test tools, engines, machines, and other mechanical devices. Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest engineering disciplines. Engineers in this discipline work on power-producing machines such as electric generators, internal combustion engines, and steam and gas turbines. They also work on power-using machines such as refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment, machine tools, material handling systems, elevators and escalators, industrial production equipment, and robots used in manufacturing.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Statistics

Nuclear Engineer                              $90,220

Nuclear engineers devise how to use radioactive materials in manufacturing, agriculture, medicine, power generation, and many other ways. Many nuclear engineers design, develop, monitor, and operate nuclear plants used to generate power. They may work on the nuclear fuel cycle — the production, handling, and use of nuclear fuel and the safe disposal of waste produced by the generation of nuclear energy. Others research the production of fusion energy. Some specialize in the development of power sources for spacecraft that use radioactive materials. Others develop and maintain the nuclear imaging technology used to diagnose and treat medical problems.

Math Required:

College Algebra Geometry Trigonometry Calculus I and II Linear Algebra Differential Equations Statistics

Petroleum Engineer                          $98,100

Petroleum engineers work in the technical profession that involves extracting oil in increasingly difficult situations as the world’s oil fields are found and depleted. Petroleum engineers search the world for reservoirs containing oil or natural gas. Once these resources are discovered, petroleum engineers work with geologists and other specialists to understand the geologic formation and properties of the rock containing the reservoir, determine the drilling methods to be used, and monitor drilling and production operations.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations, Statistics

Political Scientist                               $102,000

Political scientists study the structure and theory of government and seek practical and theoretical solutions to political problems. Most current studies and research concentrate on tangible topics such as welfare reform, political campaigns and elections, foreign relations, and immigration. Political scientists use math and statistics to predict the behavior of a group of people. They must keep track of the social, political, and monetary implications of a community’s opinions and actions. Political scientists study the population using many different applications of math, including computer science, database management, statistics, and economics.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Calculus I and II, Statistics

Statistician                                         $72,830

Statistics is the scientific application of mathematical principles to the collection, analysis, and presentation of numerical data. Statisticians apply their mathematical and statistical knowledge to the design of surveys and experiments; the collection, processing, and analysis of data; and the interpretation of the experiment and survey results. Opinion polls, statements of accuracy on scales and other measuring devices, and information about average earnings in an occupation are all usually the work of statisticians.

Math Required:

College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus I, II, and III, Linear Algebra, Ordinary Differential Equations, Theory of Analysis, Mathematical Models